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Hunters' Extras

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1. Wildlife Surveys

The Government of Saskatchewan employs several survey types to help sustainably manage game species and their habitats. Wildlife managers rely on survey information to inform management decisions for game species and public participation in wildlife data collection is important.

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2. Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)

CWD has been detected in approximately 75 per cent of farmland wildlife management zones in the province, including part of south-central and eastern Saskatchewan. The disease is present in mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk and moose. CWD-infected animals may appear healthy and show no signs of the disease. The ministry is considering options for CWD that would align with long-term management goals and provide an assessment of prevalence and distribution that is required to inform risk to big game species across the province. For more information on the 2019 CWD surveillance program, visit the Chronic Wasting Disease page of this website.

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3. Wildlife Management Zone Map

The 2019 Saskatchewan Wildlife Management Zones map will help you identify important boundaries for areas where specific wildlife regulations may apply, including wildlife management zone boundaries.

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4. HABISask Mapping

Hunting, Angling and Biodiversity Information of Saskatchewan (HABISask) is a client-centred, online mapping application that consolidates new information and existing applications.

HABISask may be used to access the Saskatchewan Conservation Data Centre (SKCDC)'s species occurrence data and to obtain information on species at risk as part of your planning efforts. As you conduct project screenings to assess for at-risk species and/or related habitats, HABISask will replace the SKCDC's Wildlife App, already used for this purpose. HABISask will provide a much improved platform including species and habitat information, basic spatial analysis tools and enhanced reporting capability.

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5. Fish and Wildlife Development Fund

The Fish and Wildlife Development Fund (FWDF) was initiated in 1970 with funding provided by 30 per cent of the revenue generated from the sale of hunting, angling and trapping licences, including big game draw application fees. The main objectives of the terrestrial/wildlife component of the FWDF are to secure and protect quality wildlife habitat, to support research and data collection that will enhance the capacity to manage wildlife and its habitats, and to promote public awareness of our wildlife resources. Through partnerships with Ducks Unlimited Canada, Nature Conservancy of Canada and the Saskatchewan Wildlife Federation, there were 645 hectares of land purchased and 2,981 hectares protected through conservation easements in the last year. Hunters have the option to make a tax deductible donation to the FWDF through HAL. Contributions will support wildlife management and habitat securement and protection initiatives.

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6. Ethical Hunting

To continue our hunting traditions for future generations, we should be aware of the important of good hunting ethics. Responsible hunters conduct themselves in a manner that consistently demonstrates respect for tradition, other outdoor enthusiasts, landowners and the general public, as well as all wildlife resources and the environment.

Since most hunting in Saskatchewan takes place on private land, hunting activity is visible to many people, including other hunters, landowners and the non-hunting public. Public perception of hunting is often determined and influenced by hunter behavior. Continued access to land depends on the actions of all hunters. Ethical hunting practices include:

Respect for the landowner

  • Always obtain permission to hunting on private land, even if the land is not posted.
  • Abide by the landowners' requests while on their property and follow all posted instructions.
  • Minimize vehicle use on all lands.
  • Refrain from travelling on roads when they are prone to damage.
  • Always thank landowners for the privilege to hunt on their land.

Respect for the resource

  • Properly identify game and follow all wildlife regulations.
  • Do your part by participating in hunter harvest and game observation surveys.
  • Ensure your firearm is properly sighted in and always strive for humane dispatch of your game.
  • Follow the principles of fair chase and report any illegal activities.

Respect for others

  • Practise safe firearm handling at all times.
  • Use discretion in transporting game animals from your hunting area to your home.
  • Respect all viewpoints of hunting.
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7. Game Bird Closure Times

Game bird closure information can be found in our Publications Centre.

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8. Treaty and Aboriginal Rights

Individuals exercising constitutionally protected Treaty or Aboriginal rights to harvest fish and wildlife for food purposes are exempt from certain provincial hunting and fishing laws. However, individuals exercising Treaty or Aboriginal rights are expected to comply with specific land, safety and conservation laws and are encouraged to support fish and wildlife management programs.

More information about Treaty and Aboriginal Hunting and Fishing Rights can be found on our website.

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9. Trespass Legislation

Legislation introduced in fall 2018 will change trespassing laws in rural Saskatchewan. Under the new legislation, hunters and trappers wishing to access private land and leased Crown land will be responsible for seeking permission from the landowner or occupant of the land. These changes will help ensure landowners and occupiers are aware of the presence of others on their property to help improve safety, reduce property damage and decrease the risk of agricultural diseases. The new law will also provide landowners with legal protection by limiting liability. This legislation is not expected to come into effect before the end of 2019.

Read the news release for more information.

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10. Waterfowl Heritage Days

September 1-2 and October 12-14, 2019
Waterfowl Heritage Days allow youth under 18 years of age to hunt waterfowl without a federal migratory bird permit, while under the supervision of an adult hunter. The youth hunter must be a Saskatchewan resident and have graduated from a firearm safety/hunter education course, and possess a provincial game bird licence (available as part of the youth game licence). The supervising hunter must be an adult and be fully licensed; they are not allowed to carry a firearm. Up to two youth hunters can be supervised by one adult at one time.

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11. Supplements

Informational supplements are available in our Publications Centre, including:
  • 2019 Saskatchewan Resident Big Game Draw Supplement
  • 2019 Saskatchewan Spring Black Bear Supplement
  • 2019 Saskatchewan White Geese Supplement
  • 2019 Canadian Resident White-tailed Deer
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12. Definitions

All-terrain vehicle (ATV): any motorized vehicle designed for off-highway travel, on or over natural terrain, water, snow, ice, marsh or swamp land and includes amphibious, ground effect, air-cushion or low-pressure tire vehicles; motorcycles and elated two-wheel vehicles; snow or track vehicles; any toboggan, trailer or other attachment to an all-terrain vehicle; or any other means of motorized transportation, not including motor boats or four wheel passenger highway vehicles unless the front bumper is more than 75 cm off the road.

Big game: includes pronghorn; black bear; bison, other than domestically raised bison; any member of the deer family, whether known as caribou, deer, elk, moose or otherwise; and wolf.

Canadian resident: A person who has their principal residence in Canada and who is a Canadian citizen or who has resided in Canada for 12 months immediately preceding the date of applying for or purchasing a licence.

Encased: in relation to a firearm, means a firearm that is completely enclosed in a fastened gun case or wrapped in fabric, plastic or similar material in a manner that makes the firearm not readily available for use.

Firearm: any device from which any shot, bullet or other missile can be discharged and, includes but is not limited to a rifle, shotgun, pellet gun, air gun, pistol, revolver, spring gun, longbow, compound bow or crossbow.

Game: big game or game bird and includes any part of any big game or game bird.

Game bird: migratory game bird and upland game bird.

Game preserve: any are designated as such in regulation, in which hunting or trapping of any kind is not allowed.

Harvest ledger: a document that is associated with a licence on which a person records information related to the taking or killing of an animal (date and species) as required by regulation.

Hide: the skin or pelt of an animal, but does not include the other attached parts of the animal, such as horns, antlers, claws or skull.

Hunting: includes taking, wounding, killing, chasing, pursuing, worrying, capturing, following after or on the trail of, searching for, shooting at, trapping, setting snares for, stalking or lying in wait for any wildlife, or attempting to do any of those things, whether or not the wildlife is subsequently captured, wounded or killed.

Immediate family member: an individual’s father, mother, grandfather, grandmother, brother, sister, child, grandchild, spouse or common-law spouse.

Migratory game bird: includes any game bird protected by the Migratory Birds Convention Act (Canada), as amended from time to time, or the regulations made under the act.

Muzzle-loading rifle: a rifle that is loaded through the front opening of the barrel.

Non-resident: A person who is not a Saskatchewan or Canadian resident.

Pelt: means the skin or hide of a fur animal or a portion of the skin or hide, complete with any natural fur, hair or wool, but does not include parts of the animal such as the claws, skull, bones or carcass.

Provincial or municipal road: a road shown on the most recent version of the Saskatchewan Official Road Map.

Power snare: a mechanically activated neck snare that is immediately drawn closed by the force of a spring no less than 30 cm in length that is used for the taking of fur animals.

Processed: in the case of a big game hide or pelt, a tanning or similar treatment to preserve the hide but does not include drying the hide or rubbing it with salt and in the case of a meat carcass, means cut up and preserved for consumption.

Road: a prepared surface designed for vehicle traffic.

Saskatchewan resident: A person who is a Canadian resident, has their principal residence in Saskatchewan and has resided in Saskatchewan for three months immediately preceding the date of applying for or purchasing a licence, or regular members of the Canadian Armed Forces stationed and residing in Saskatchewan, or who were Saskatchewan residents when recruited or deployed from the province.

Seal: a document (tag) associated with a licence that must be cancelled immediately after wildlife is killed.

Snare: a device for the taking of any wildlife in which the animal is caught by a noose.

Stand: any stand, blind, platform, tree seat or other similar structure used for the purpose of assisting a person while hunting or viewing wildlife, and includes any structure commonly known as a tree stand.

Trail: means a route regularly traveled by vehicle.

Trap: includes a spring trap, snare, deadfall, box or net or any other device used to capture any wildlife.

Upland game bird: includes ruffed grouse, spruce grouse, sharp-tailed grouse, ring-necked pheasants, gray (Hungarian) partridges, sage grouse and ptarmigans.

Vehicle: includes a motorized, conveyance, trailer, tractor, snowmobile, aircraft of any other conveyance, other than a boat, that is drawn, propelled or driven by any mechanical means and includes any accessory attached to a vehicle.

Veteran: means a Saskatchewan resident or Canadian resident who is a former member of the Canadian Armed Forces, has successfully underwent basic training and has been honourably discharged.

Wildlife: a vertebrae animal of any species, excluding fish, that is wild by nature in any part of Saskatchewan and includes any part, tissue, genetic material, eggs, sperm or embryos and any exotic wildlife found in Saskatchewan.

Wildlife management unit (WMU): any area designated as such in regulation in which special regulations apply.

Wildlife management zone (WMZ): identifiable boundaries across the province to help direct hunting opportunities and better manage wildlife populations.

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