Effective July 11, 2021, Saskatchewan entered Step Three of the Re-Opening Roadmap and the public health order relative to COVID-19 was lifted. All restrictions related to the public health order were removed as of that date.

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How To Protect Yourself

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1. What is COVID-19?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that can cause diseases ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS). Some cause illness in people, while others circulate among animals. Some coronaviruses transmit easily from person to person while others do not. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), a new virus and the cause of COVID-19, which causes mild to moderately severe symptoms and deaths.

COVID-19 can be transmitted by people who have symptoms and by people who are infectious but not symptomatic in the two days before symptoms develop, spreading from an infected person to others through respiratory droplets and aerosols when an infected person coughs, sneezes, sings, shouts or talks.

Most people with COVID-19 illness will recover on their own. Severe or worsening symptoms may require supportive treatment in hospital.

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2. How to Protect Yourself

The best protection against COVID-19 is to be fully vaccinated. Additional, everyday preventive actions can continue to reduce transmission of this respiratory illness.

  • Practise proper cough and sneezing etiquette (into a tissue or the bend of your elbow)
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water; if soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands
  • Clean and disinfect high-touch surfaces regularly
  • Wear a non-medical mask
  • Stay home with even mild symptoms and get tested

If you are providing care to someone with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 at home, keep distant from an affected individual as much as possible. Hand hygiene should be performed frequently and wear a medical grade mask when in the same room with the affected individual until they are released from self-isolation by public health.

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3. Masking

As of July 11, 2021, wearing a non-medical mask is no longer mandated in indoor public spaces in Saskatchewan, but you can choose to continue wearing one to protect those who aren't yet eligible for vaccination (children under 12) or who are at higher risk.

If you are not fully vaccinated, public health officials continue to recommend wearing a mask in indoor settings outside your home where physical distancing is not possible, even if you have no symptoms.

Whether you are electing to mask or are required to mask in certain workplaces, wear your "best mask" properly.

Mask Type

  • Regardless of the type of mask you are wearing, if air is escaping from the sides or top, it isn't working as well as it could be. You should adjust the fit.
  • Medical masks are a good choice if you are at higher risk of being exposed to COVID-19 or at risk of more severe disease or outcomes.
  • Disposable masks often block more respiratory droplets than cloth masks.
  • Cloth masks with at least three layers of a tightly woven fabric, like cotton, work best. A middle layer with a filter-type fabric will block more respiratory droplets.
  • Bandanas and gaiter masks are not appropriate face coverings. They are ineffective at blocking respiratory droplets.
  • Face shields are not a substitute for masks and should not be used in place of masks. Face shields can be used to provide eye protection as an alternative to other forms of approved eye protection, such as goggles or safety glasses.

Mask Fit

  • Masks should cover the nose, mouth, and chin areas with few gaps. A mask that fits well will block more infectious particles. Even if the mask is high quality, if it is not tight to your face, it isn't working as well as it could be. As all faces are different shapes, try the tips below to improve fit and use what works best for you.
  • Experiment with tying the knots at different distances from the end of the ear loop to find the best fit for you.
  • Choose a mask with a nose wire whenever possible, as it minimizes air leaking out of the top of your mask.
  • You can wear a well-fitting cloth mask over a disposable non-medical mask creating three layers, and a better fit with fewer air leaks. Note that some people find that it impedes their breathing and should not use this improvement.

Information on how to make a non-medical mask and how to properly put on or remove a non-medical mask can be found on the Public Health Agency of Canada's website.

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4. What is Physical Distancing

Physical distancing is proven to be one of the most effective ways to reduce the spread of COVID-19. It is typically ensuring two metres between you and others from outside your household.

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