Effective July 11, 2021, Saskatchewan entered Step Three of the Re-Opening Roadmap and the public health order relative to COVID-19 was lifted. All restrictions related to the public health order were removed as of that date.

Renseignements en français

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A number of pages on the Government of Saskatchewan's website have been professionally translated in French. These translations are identified by a yellow box in the right or left rail that resembles the link below. The home page for French-language content on this site can be found at:

Renseignements en Français

Where an official translation is not available, Google™ Translate can be used. Google™ Translate is a free online language translation service that can translate text and web pages into different languages. Translations are made available to increase access to Government of Saskatchewan content for populations whose first language is not English.

Software-based translations do not approach the fluency of a native speaker or possess the skill of a professional translator. The translation should not be considered exact, and may include incorrect or offensive language. The Government of Saskatchewan does not warrant the accuracy, reliability or timeliness of any information translated by this system. Some files or items cannot be translated, including graphs, photos and other file formats such as portable document formats (PDFs).

Any person or entities that rely on information obtained from the system does so at his or her own risk. Government of Saskatchewan is not responsible for any damage or issues that may possibly result from using translated website content. If you have any questions about Google™ Translate, please visit: Google™ Translate FAQs.

Medical Leaves

Medical leave encompasses any leave relating to personal medical care and immediate family care. This includes organ donation, critically ill child care, critically ill adult care and compassionate care.

To view a summary of these leaves, please review the Employment Leaves Quick Reference - Medical.

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1. Organ Donation

Organ donation leave is unpaid, job-protected leave of up to 26 weeks for the purpose of undergoing surgery to donate all or part of an organ.

An employee must have worked with the employer for more than 13 weeks to be eligible for this leave. Written notice must be provided to the employer four weeks before the leave begins. The employee must also notify the employer as soon as possible about their return date. An employer may ask for a medical certificate with the notice.

Upon return, an employee is entitled to return to the same job if the employment leave is for 60 days or less. If the leave is longer than 60 days, the employee can be reinstated to a comparable job. The employee must receive at least the same wage and benefits as before the leave.

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2. Critically Ill Child Care

Critically Ill Child Care Leave is an unpaid, job-protected leave of up to 37 weeks. This leave can be taken in one block of time or in multiple blocks of time within a 52-week period providing no block is shorter than one week in duration.

Parents are eligible for this leave to provide care or support to a critically ill or injured child. Eligible parents who take this leave from work may be eligible for Employment Insurance Special Benefits for Parents of Critically Ill Children. Visit a Service Canada Office or call them toll-free at 1-800-206-7218.

An employee must have worked with the employer for more than 13 consecutive weeks to be eligible for this leave. Written notice must be provided to the employer as soon as possible before the leave begins. The employee must also notify the employer as soon as possible on their return date.

Upon returning, an employee is entitled to return to the same job if the employment leave is for 60 days or less. If the leave is longer than 60 days, the employee can be reinstated to a comparable job. The employee must receive at least the same wage and benefits as before the leave.

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3. Critically Ill Adult Care

Critically ill adult leave is an unpaid, job protected leave of up to 17 weeks to care for an adult family member who is critically ill or injured.

An employee must have worked with the employer for at least 13 weeks to be eligible for this leave. Written notice must be provided to the employer as soon as possible before the leave begins. The employee must also notify the employer as soon as possible on their return date.

The employer can request a medical certificate from a qualified medical practitioner. The medical certificate needs to confirm that the family member is ill and needs their assistance.

Upon returning, an employee is entitled to return to the same job if the employment leave is for 60 days or less. If the leave is longer than 60 days, the employee can be reinstated to a comparable job. The employee must receive at least the same wage and benefits as before the leave.

For more information about eligibility for Employment Insurance benefits, please contact Service Canada at 1-800-206-7218.

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4. Compassionate Care

Compassionate Care leave is an unpaid, job-protected leave of up to 28 weeks. This can be taken in single or multiple blocks of time within a 52-week period providing no block is shorter than one week in duration. The leave is intended to provide employees the opportunity to provide care and support to a family member who is gravely ill and who has a significant risk of death within 26 weeks.

You can receive compassionate care benefits for a variety of family members – both yours and those of your spouse or common-law partner.

Note: A common-law partner is a person who has been living in a conjugal relationship with another person for at least a year.

To be eligible for this leave, an employee must have worked with the employer for more than 13 consecutive weeks. Written notice must be provided to the employer as soon as possible before the leave begins. The employee must provide a doctor's note at the employer's request. The employee must notify the employer of their intended return to work date as soon as possible.

The employee can return to the same job if the leave is 60 days or less. The employer may reinstate the employee into a comparable job if the leave is longer than 60 days. The employee must receive at least the same rate of pay and benefits as before the leave.

Employees who take this leave may be eligible for Employment Insurance Compassionate Care Benefits through Service Canada. Contact Service Canada toll-free at 1-800-206-7218 for more information.

Note: Under employment insurance rules for compassionate care leave, a common-law partner is a person who has been living in a conjugal relationship with another person for at least a year.

Under Canada's Employment Insurance Act, employees can receive leave to care for their family members or a family member of a spouse or common-law partner. Refer to the Employment Insurance Act for clarification.

Your family members Family members of your spouse or
common-law partner
  • Children
  • Wife, husband, common-law partner
  • Father, mother
  • Father's wife, mother's husband
  • Common-law partner of the father or the mother
  • Brothers, sisters, stepbrothers, stepsisters
  • Grandparents, step-grandparents
  • Grandchildren, their spouses or common-law partners
  • Sons-in-law, daughters-in-law (married or common law)
  • Father-in-law, mother-in-law (married or common law)
  • Brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law (married or common law)
  • Uncles, aunts, their spouses or common-law partners
  • Nephews, nieces, their spouses or common-law partners
  • Current or former foster parents
  • Current or former foster children, their spouses or common-law partners
  • Current or former wards
  • Current or former guardians, their spouses or common-law partners
  • Children
  • Father, mother (married or common law)
  • Father's wife, mother's husband
  • Common-law partner of the father or the mother of your spouse or common-law partner
  • Brothers, sisters, stepbrothers, stepsisters
  • Grandparents
  • Grandchildren
  • Sons-in-law, daughters-in-law (married or common law)
  • Uncles, aunts
  • Nephews, nieces
  • Current or former foster parents
  • Current or former wards

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