With the recent 2017-18 Budget announcement, programs and services affected will be updated shortly. Posted March 22, 2017

Renseignements en français

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A number of pages on the Government of Saskatchewan`s web site have been professionally translated in French. These translations are identified by a yellow text box that resembles the link below and can be found in the right hand rail of the page. The home page for French-language content on this site can be found here:

Renseignements en Français

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Canada's National and International Honours

In 1967, Canada's centennial year, the Government of Canada established a system of national honours. The system was expanded in 1972 and subsequent years and continues to evolve. The Sovereign approves the creation of all honours and the Governor General confers them in her name. There are three categories of honours, Orders, Decorations and Medals.

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1. Orders

Orders recognize significant achievements and conspicuous service in important fields of human endeavour.  Although not part of the Canadian honours system, provincial orders have been recognized by the Government of Canada as having their place in the Canadian order of precedence.  Canada's national honours system includes the following orders:

The Order of Canada

The Order of Canada, instituted in 1967, recognizes people who exemplify the highest qualities of citizenship.  There are three grades in the Order: Companion (C.C.), maximum of 15 a year, limited to 150 people at any one time; Officer (O.C.), maximum of 50 a year; and Member (C.M.), maximum of 100 a year. The Queen is Sovereign of the Order of Canada and the Governor General is Chancellor and Principal Companion.

Appointments to the Order of Canada are recommended to the Governor General by an Advisory Council of the Order from among nominations received from the public. This Council comprises up to eight persons including the Chief Justice of Canada as Chairman. Lists are published twice annually, close to New Year's Day and Canada Day. The Governor General holds investitures three times annually.

The Order of Military Merit

The Order of Military Merit was instituted in 1972 as part of the national honours. It recognizes conspicuous merit and exceptional service in the Canadian Forces, both Regular and Reserves. There are three grades: Commander (C.M.M.), Officer (O.M.M.), and Member (M.M.M.).  The Queen is Sovereign and the Governor General is Chancellor and a Commander of the Order, while the Chief of the Defence Staff is the Principal Commander.  Two investitures are held annually.

The Order of Merit of the Police Forces

Instituted in 2000, this Order recognizes conspicuous merit and exceptional service by members and employees of the Canadian Police Forces. It is the civilian counterpart to the Order of Military Merit. There are three grades: Commander (C.O.M.), Officer (O.O.M.), and Member (M.O.M.).

The Royal Victorian Order

The Royal Victorian Order was established by Queen Victoria on April 21, 1896, as a reward for extraordinary, important, or personal services performed for the Sovereign or the Royal Family. The Order may be conferred by The Queen of Canada to recognize services rendered to the Sovereign or to members of Canada's Royal Family.

Although not limited to Canada, the Order is part of the Canadian honours system. Canadians are eligible for three grades in the Order: Commander (C.V.O.), Lieutenant (L.V.O.), and Member (M.V.O.) and are also eligible for the Royal Victorian Medal (R.V.M.).

The Order of St. John

The Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem was established in Canada in 1883, and is conferred for good service to the Order. The Sovereign Head of the Order is the Queen; the Governor General is the Prior of Canada; the Lieutenant Governors are Vice-Priors. There are five grades: Bailiffs or Dames Grand Cross (GCStJ), Knights or Dames of Justice or Grace (KStJ or DStJ ), Commanders (CStJ), Officers (OstJ), and Member (SBStJ or SSStJ).

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2. Decorations

Decorations recognize various degrees of bravery, professionalism and exceptional devotion to duty, in three categories: military valour; civilian bravery; and meritorious service.

Decorations for Military Valour

In 1993, the Government of Canada instituted a series of three Canadian Military Valour Decorations for Gallantry in battle:

  • The Victoria Cross (V.C.), established by Queen Victoria in 1856, is awarded for the most conspicuous bravery, a daring or pre-eminent act of valour or self-sacrifice or extreme devotion to duty, in the presence of the enemy. The Victoria Cross takes precedence over all other orders and decorations.
  • The Star of Military Valour (S.M.V.) is awarded for distinguished and valiant service in the presence of the enemy.
  • The Medal of Military Valour (M.M.V.) is awarded for an act of valour or devotion to duty in the presence of the enemy.

Civilian Decorations for Bravery

In 1972, Canada instituted three bravery decorations to give recognition to those who risk their lives to save or attempt to save the lives or property of others:

  • The Cross of Valour (C.V.) is awarded for acts of the most conspicuous courage in circumstances of extreme peril. It takes precedence immediately after the Victoria Cross.
  • The Star of Courage (S.C.) is awarded for acts of conspicuous courage in circumstances of great peril.
  • The Medal of Bravery (M.B.) is awarded for acts of bravery in hazardous circumstances.

Meritorious Service Decorations

  • The Meritorious Service Cross (M.S.C.) (military division) was instituted in 1984 to recognize outstanding deeds or activities in the Canadian Forces. In 1991, the civil division was created to recognize outstanding deeds or activities which bring considerable benefit or honour to Canada.
  • The Meritorious Service Medal (M.S.M.) (military and civil divisions), instituted in 1991, recognizes a high standard of military or civilian service to Canada.

Royal Victorian Medal

Queen Victoria established the Royal Victorian Medal in 1896 as a reward of personal service to the Sovereign or the Royal Family, and as a mark of royal esteem. The Medal is conferred upon civilians and non-commissioned military personnel.
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3. Medals

Medals recognize general service or service with distinction, commemorate special occasions and anniversaries, or are awarded for long-term good conduct and exemplary service. They do not usually include post-nominal letters.

Recent military medals

  • Korea Medal
  • Canadian Volunteer Service Medal for Korea
  • General Campaign Star and General Service Medal
  • Gulf and Kuwait Medal
  • Somalia Service Medals
  • South-West Asia Service Medal
  • Special Service Medal
  • United Nations Medals
  • International Commission and Organization Medals
  • Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal

Commemorative medals

A number of medals have been awarded to Canadians, both civilian and military, to commemorate special occasions or anniversaries:

  • Queen Victoria Golden Jubilee (1887)
  • Queen Victoria Diamond Jubilee (1897)
  • King Edward VII Coronation (1902)
  • King George V Coronation (1911)
  • King George V Silver Jubilee (1935)
  • King George VI Coronation (1937)
  • Queen Elizabeth II Coronation (1953)
  • Canadian Centennial Medal (1967)
  • Queen Elizabeth II Silver Jubilee (1977)
  • Canada 125 Commemorative Medal (1992)
  • Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal (2002)
  • Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal (2012)

Long service and good conduct medals

  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police Long Service Medal (1934), awarded for twenty years of service and good conduct.
  • Canadian Forces Decoration (C.D.) (1949), awarded for 12 years of service and good conduct.

Exemplary service medals

These are awarded for 20 years of meritorious service and good conduct.  A bar, worn on the ribbon of the medal, is awarded for each additional 10 years of service:

  • The Police Exemplary Service Medal (1983)
  • The Corrections Exemplary Service Medal (1984)
  • The Fire Services Exemplary Service Medal (1985)
  • The Coast Guard Exemplary Service Medal (1991)
  • The Emergency Medical Services Exemplary Service Medal (1994)
  • The Peace Officers Exemplary Service Medal (2004)

Special medal

The Queen's Medal for Champion Shot, awarded since 1923 and made a separate Canadian medal in 1991, is awarded annually to the best sharpshooters in the Canadian Forces and the RCMP.

Other medals

Several provincial decorations and medals including the Saskatchewan Volunteer Medal (S.V.M) and the Saskatchewan Centennial Medal, and the Service Medal of the Order of St. John and Commissionaire Long Service Medal are given status here as "Other Decorations and Medals."

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4. International Honours

Contributions of Saskatchewan people are recognized, not only at home, but in many other countries. In 2004, the Protocol Office expanded recognition to include recipients of honours of other countries.

Saskatchewan people who have received international honours:

Albania
Mr. Dickson Bailey
Medals of Special Civic Merits
2003

Austria
Mr. E.F. Anthony Merchant Q. C.
Decoration of Honour in Silver
2006

Denmark
Ms. Inge Ryan
Knight of the Order of the Dannebrog
2004

France
Mr. Boyd Maynard Anderson
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Leonard Devenish Apps
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Roy Armstrong
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Denis Charles Chisholm, S.V.M.
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Allan Ellis Countryman
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Stanley Creaser
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Harold Hague
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. John Raper Hall
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Joseph Porteous Harvey
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. David John Edward Holtz
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Walter Ernest Howe
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Harold Magrath
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Jim W. McCulloch
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. John Milani
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Leonard John Ordon
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Marvin Laurie Potter
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Arthur Charles Edward Ramshaw
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Alfred Stulberg
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Earl Roy Taylor
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. John M. Usipiuk
Knight of France’s National Order of the Legion of Honour
2014

Mr. Matt Gess
Knight of the Legion of Honour Medal
2007

Mr. Bernard Wilhelm
Chavalier de l’Ordre des Palmes académiques
1994

M. Albert Dubé
Chevalier de l'Ordre national du Mérite
1998

Germany
Dr. Günter Kocks
Bundesverdienstkreuz 1. Klasse
(Order of Germany, 1st Class)
1999

Japan
Mr. Arthur Tsuneo Wakabayashi, C.M.
Order of the Rising Sun with Gold Rays
2012

Dr. Morris C. Shumiatcher, O.C., S.O.M., Q.C.
Officer of the Order of the Sacred Treasure
1985

Philippines
Mr. John Treleaven
Order of Sikatuna, Commander (Lakan)
2000

Poland
Mr. Henry Lebioda
Order of Merit – 1995
Order of Poland – 1989

Sweden
Mr. Ronald E. Shirkey, Q.C.
Royal Order of the Polar Star
2000

The Hon. Larry A. Kyle
Royal Order of the Polar Star
1989

Ukraine
The Hon. Ken Krawetz
Order of Kniaz (King) Yaroslav the Wise, Fifth Class
2009

Mr. Orest Warnyca
Medal for Noble Work and Virtue
2009

Mr. Eugene Krenosky
Medal for Noble Work and Virtue
2009

The Hon. Raynell Andreychuk
Order of Kniaz (King) Yaroslav the Wise, Fifth Class
2008

Dr. Dmytro Cipywnyk, C.M.
Badge of the Order for Merit, Third Class
2002

Royal Victorian Order

Dr. D Michael Jackson, L.V.O., C.D.
1987

Dr. D Michael Jackson, C.V.O., S.O.M., C.D.
Promoted 2005

Ms. Deborah Saum, M.V.O.
2005

Mr. Russ Marchuk, R.V.M.
2005

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