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Saskatchewan Income Support Client Personas

A number of benefits are available to clients of the Saskatchewan Income Support (SIS) program. These clients can also receive income from other sources, such as federal benefits, income tax refunds or employment.

To learn about the types of income that clients can receive, see the examples below. Please note that these are general examples and not actual ministry clients. Each client’s personal situation is different, so their incomes will vary. The calculations provided in all scenarios are estimates.

Along with financial benefits, SIS clients are also eligible for Supplementary Health Benefits, which give them access to a number of health services and products in addition to their universal health benefits.

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TYREN

Tyren is a single man who lives in Regina. He has a Grade 10 education, is a SIS client and also has a part-time job. Tyren’s whole income is $1,482 per month.

 

In SIS, single people can earn $325 in employment income each month, and any employment income above $325 is deducted from their SIS benefits, dollar-for-dollar. Since Tyren earns $400 each month from his part-time job, $75 is deducted from his SIS benefits. This means that he receives $900 from SIS plus $400 from employment each month.

 

Tyren is currently enrolled in an Adult Basic Education program to earn his Grade 12. To support his education, he receives an additional $50 through the Education and Training Incentive.

 

He also receives a number of payments on a quarterly basis:

  • $89.50 Saskatchewan Low Income Tax Credit;
  • $106.53 GST tax credit;
  • $170.00 Climate Action Incentive Payment; and
  • $30.37 Canada Workers Benefit.

Each month, Tyren receives $1,350 in income as well as an additional $396 on a quarterly basis, for a total of $1,482 per month.

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MORGAN

Morgan is single, lives in Saskatoon and is expecting a baby in the next three months. She recently left an interpersonal violence situation and is moving to a new apartment. Morgan’s whole income is $1,499 per month.

 

Morgan is now a SIS client and does not currently receive income from any other sources. She will receive a monthly $1,375 SIS benefit, plus a number of one-time benefits totalling $1,400 to support her in leaving the interpersonal violence situation. These additional benefits will help her cover moving costs, purchase household items and pay her security deposit and utility hook-up fees.

 

When Morgan has her baby, she’ll receive a one-time payment of $400 through SIS to help her care for her baby before she’s able to receive the Canada Child Benefit. She’ll receive $619.75 from the Canada Child Benefit each month going forward.

 

Morgan also currently receives a number of payments on a quarterly basis:

  • $112.53 GST rebate;
  • $89.50 Saskatchewan Low Income Tax Credit; and
  • $170.00 quarterly Climate Action Incentive Payment.

Morgan currently receives $1,375 per month in income and will receive $1,958 per month after she has her baby. She’ll also receive an additional $372 on a quarterly basis, for a total of $1,499 per month.

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DAWN

Dawn is a single mother living in Regina with her three children who are under six years of age. She recently began taking a career training program. Dawn’s whole income is $4,055 per month.

 

Each month, Dawn receives:

  • $1,050 SIS benefit payment;
  • $200 Education and Training Incentive (while in training);
  • $500 in Child Support;
  • Saskatchewan Employment Supplement of $164; and
  • Canada Child Benefit of $1,859.25.

Her childcare costs of $1,000 per month are fully covered by the Child Care Subsidy.

 

Dawn also receives a number of payments on a quarterly basis:

  • $290.75 GST rebate;
  • $214.25 Saskatchewan Low Income Tax Credit; and
  • $340.00 Climate Action Incentive Payment.

Dawn receives a total of $3,773 in income per month as well as an additional $845 on a quarterly basis, for a total of $4,055 per month.

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SETH AND JORDYN

Seth and Jordyn live in La Ronge and are parents to a two-year-old child. Seth works part-time and Jordyn attends a career training program. Seth and Jordyn’s whole income is $3,339 per month.

 

Each month, Seth earns $700 in income from his job. Families can make $500 per month in employment income before their SIS benefits are deducted, so Seth and Jordyn receive $1,640 each month from SIS after the additional $200 is deducted from their benefits.

 

They also receive $619.75 each month from the Canada Child Benefit and their childcare costs of $300 per month are fully covered by the Child Care Subsidy. During the months that Jordyn attends her career training program, they will receive an additional $100 per month through the Education and Training Incentive.

 

Seth and Jordyn also receive a number of payments on a quarterly basis:

  • $205.25 GST tax credit;
  • $214.25 Saskatchewan Low Income Tax Credit
  • $327.25 Climate Action Incentive payment; and
  • $91.12 Canada Workers Benefit.

They receive a total of $3,060 in income per month as well as an additional $838 on a quarterly basis, for a total of $3,339 per month.

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BYRON

Byron is 62 years old and retired. He lives in Yorkton and cares for his three grandchildren who are ages 5, 8 and 10. Byron’s whole income is $3,199 per month.

 

Each month, Byron receives:

  • $890 in SIS benefits;
  • $350 from Canada Pension Plan; and
  • $1,665.58 through the Canada Child Benefit.

He also receives a number of other payments on a quarterly basis:

  • $290.75 GST rebate;
  • $214.25 Saskatchewan Low Income Tax Credit; and
  • $374.00 Climate Action Incentive Payment.

Byron receives $2,906 in income each month as well as an additional $879 on a quarterly basis, for a total of $3,199 per month.