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Water Security Agency Releases Water Supply Outlook

Released on July 8, 2015

Today, the Water Security Agency released a water supply outlook for the province which summarizes stream flows and water supply in reservoirs and as of July 1. 

“Saskatchewan is fortunate to have a system of dams and control structures that help provide consistency in water supply in both wet and dry years,” Minister Responsible for the Water Security Agency Herb Cox said.  “Despite lower than normal precipitation and run-off, Saskatchewan’s water bodies will continue to meet the needs of our province.” 

Reservoirs were full following snowmelt and as a result water supplies will remain sufficient for domestic, irrigation, municipal, and industrial use.  Since April 1, most of Saskatchewan has received little precipitation, with a significant portion of the agricultural area receiving less than half of normal rainfall.  Lake levels are declining as a result.

Inflow to Lake Diefenbaker is well below normal due to a low snow pack and limited rain in the mountains; Lake Diefenbaker is not expected to rise above its present level.  Flow on the South Saskatchewan River is below normal.  Lake levels in the Qu’Appelle are dropping and the Water Security Agency will begin to operate control structures to keep lake levels within their desired operating range.  Last Mountain Lake is expected to remain above its target range through the summer and the Craven Control Structure will remain open to facilitate the drawdown. 

The Water Security Agency will continue to monitor streamflow, lake levels, and water supply conditions across Saskatchewan and will issue the next Water Supply Outlook this summer. 

Information on current flows and lake levels can be found at www.wsask.ca.

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For more information, contact:

Dale Hjertaas
Water Security Agency
Regina
Phone: 306-787-2892
Email: Dale.Hjertaas@wsask.ca

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