The Government of Saskatchewan extends deepest condolences to all the families and friends of those affected by the Humboldt Broncos bus crash.  Support services and resources are available

Google Translate Disclaimer

A number of pages on the Government of Saskatchewan`s web site have been professionally translated in French. These translations are identified by a yellow text box that resembles the link below and can be found in the right hand rail of the page. The home page for French-language content on this site can be found here:

Renseignements en Français

Where an official translation is not available, Google™ Translate can be used. Google™ Translate is a free online language translation service that can translate text and web pages into different languages. Translations are made available to increase access to Government of Saskatchewan content for populations whose first language is not English.

The results of software-based translation do not approach the fluency of a native speaker or possess the skill of a professional translator. The translation should not be considered exact, and may include incorrect or offensive language Government of Saskatchewan does not warrant the accuracy, reliability or timeliness of any information translated by this system. Some files or items cannot be translated, including graphs, photos, and other file formats such as portable document formats (PDFs).

Any person or entities that rely on information obtained from the system does so at his or her own risk. Government of Saskatchewan is not responsible for any damage or issues that may possibly result from using translated website content. If you have any questions about Google™ Translate, please visit: Google™ Translate FAQs.

Canada’s Cannabis Act

Please note that cannabis possession, sale and use is still illegal. The official legalization date will be determined by the federal government in 2018.

The federal government has introduced legislation, the proposed Cannabis Act, that will make non-medical cannabis legal in Canada in 2018. The regulations for medical cannabis will not change when cannabis is legalized.  

While the decision to legalize cannabis was made by the federal government, provinces and territories have been given the task of developing regulations in certain areas. Below is a table showing what provinces and territories have the ability to regulate:

 Activity Federal responsibility? Provincial responsibility?
Possession limits
Federal government regulation: Maximum of 30 grams for adults
Yes No
Trafficking  Yes No
 Advertisement and packaging* Yes  No
Impaired driving Yes  Yes
 Medical cannabis Yes  No
 Seed-to-sale tracking system Yes  No
 Production (cultivation and processing) Yes  No
Age limit
The federal government’s minimum age is 18 years and provinces can choose to go higher
Yes  Yes
 Public health Yes  Yes
 Education Yes  Yes
Taxation  Yes  Yes
Home cultivation (growing plants at home) 
Federal government regulation: Maximum of 4 plants, with a maximum height of 100 cm
Yes  Yes
 Distribution and wholesaling No Yes
 Retail model No  Yes
 Retail locations and rules No  Yes
Regulatory compliance  Yes  Yes
Public consumption No  Yes
 Land use and/or zoning No Yes 

*The federal government’s proposed Cannabis Act includes restrictions on several types of promotional activities, such as:
  • Promotion considered appealing to youth;
  • Promotion that includes false, misleading, or deceptive information;
  • Promotion through sponsorship, testimonials, or endorsements; and
  • Promotion using the depictions of persons, celebrities, characters, or animals.

These proposed restrictions on promotion are meant to protect youth from being persuaded to use cannabis through marketing or advertising. At the same time, adult consumers need to have clear, objective information so they can make informed decisions about using cannabis. To make sure clear information is available to adult consumers, the legislation would require factual and accurate information about cannabis products, information about the level of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the main active ingredient in cannabis) in products, and other ingredients that have been added to cannabis products. 

For a more detailed summary of the proposed Cannabis Act, and information on the health implications of cannabis use, please see the following links:

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