Google Translate Disclaimer

A number of pages on the Government of Saskatchewan`s web site have been professionally translated in French. These translations are identified by a yellow text box that resembles the link below and can be found in the right hand rail of the page. The home page for French-language content on this site can be found here:

Renseignements en Français

Where an official translation is not available, Google™ Translate can be used. Google™ Translate is a free online language translation service that can translate text and web pages into different languages. Translations are made available to increase access to Government of Saskatchewan content for populations whose first language is not English.

The results of software-based translation do not approach the fluency of a native speaker or possess the skill of a professional translator. The translation should not be considered exact, and may include incorrect or offensive language Government of Saskatchewan does not warrant the accuracy, reliability or timeliness of any information translated by this system. Some files or items cannot be translated, including graphs, photos, and other file formats such as portable document formats (PDFs).

Any person or entities that rely on information obtained from the system does so at his or her own risk. Government of Saskatchewan is not responsible for any damage or issues that may possibly result from using translated website content. If you have any questions about Google™ Translate, please visit: Google™ Translate FAQs.

Chickpea: Fertilizer Considerations

Fertility requirements for chickpea are not well-defined. Based on limited data, the requirements for phosphorus, potassium and sulphur are similar to pea or lentil.

A well-inoculated crop should not require nitrogen fertilizer, provided the appropriate Rhizobium inoculants are used and nitrogen fixation is optimized. 

If nitrogen fixation is not optimized due to unfavourable growing conditions (e.g. relatively dry seed bed), chickpea may benefit from low rates of starter N in some years.

High rates of starter nitrogen

Some growers and researchers are testing the application of higher rates of starter nitrogen (applied away from the seed) without inoculant to enhance chickpea's early vegetative growth and to speed crop maturity by causing a nitrogen deficiency in late summer.

Excessive use of nitrogen fertilizer, or high levels of available soil nitrogen, reduces nitrogen fixation and may delay maturity. A soil test will provide a guideline for fertility needs.

Sensitivity to fertilizer

  • Chickpea seed is very sensitive to seed placed fertilizer.
  • Nitrogen fertilizer should not be placed with the seed.
  • Pulse crops require phosphorus to support healthy growth, hasten maturity and support nitrogen fixation.

Under good moisture conditions, 17 kg/ha (15 lb./ac.) actual phosphate can be safely seed placed with a 2.5 cm (1 in.) spread and 15-18 cm (6-7 in.) row spacing.

  • If additional phosphorus is required, side-banding, a wider distribution spread, or the use of Jumpstart® is recommended.
  • If potassium or sulphur (sulphate form) fertilizer is required, it should be side-banded or mid-row-banded. Applications of ammonium sulphate can be broadcast.
  • If irregular patches appear in the field that indicate a possible macro-nutrient or micro-nutrient deficiency, conduct a comparative tissue-plus-soil test to determine if a deficiency exists. It is important to remember that irregular patches in the field may be related to disease symptoms.

Micro-nutrient requirements

To date, no research has been conducted in Saskatchewan to assess micro-nutrient requirements of chickpea. Apply test strips of the plant-available form of the possible deficient nutrient(s) and harvest the strips separately to determine whether there is an economic benefit, or improved yield or quality. Contact your soil testing laboratory for diagnostic tissue and soil sampling procedures.

If irregular patches appear in the field that indicate a possible macro-nutrient or micro-nutrient deficiency, conduct a comparative tissue-plus-soil test to determine if a deficiency exists.  It is important to remember that irregular patches in the field may be related to disease symptoms. 

Next: Chickpea Seeding Considerations 

We need your feedback to improve saskatchewan.ca. Help us improve